The Road Less Traveled

This morning after a delicious breakfast outside at the Estancia La Jolla Hotel, one of those breakfasts that makes you wonder why you don’t sit outside and enjoy your coffee each morning more often and then you remember it’s because usually you have all of about 2 minutes to suck down your coffee while grabbing your purse, keys, and children, I remembered that one of the guests at dinner last night mentioned the hotel was a short walk to the Torrey Pines Gliderport overlooking the Pacific Ocean.

I glanced at the time. I had less than 40 minutes to print my boarding pass at the hotel business center and take a quick walk. I could make it there and back in time to catch my 8:45 airport shuttle. I hadn’t been to the San Diego area in 10 years and I wasn’t going to miss the chance to at least get a glance of the Pacific.

The air was cooler and thick with moisture and it was overcast. I walked to the rear of the hotel property and cut through a parking lot where a security guard pointed me in the right direction. Not many people were out, but as I headed up a small rise behind a modern building I could see SUVs lining the street and people out walking their dogs toward the bluff. The landscape changed slightly to sandier terrain and the horizon was clear so I knew I was getting close.

Finally I saw it. I walked toward the beginning of a trail that meanders down the bluff that is frequented by local surfers. I stood and enjoyed the view and snapped a few photos, knowing full well I looked every part the tourist dressed in jeans, and whipping my camera out of my purse, already overloaded with a book I was planning on reading on the flight home.

I had to jog back part of the way so I wouldn’t be late for the shuttle, especially once I realized that I had to circle around the entire hotel property to the front lobby entrance because I’d already turned in my room key, but the view was worth it.

I can be set in my ways and jaded so many times, encumbered with the stress of everyday life. I don’t want to forget that deep down inside I’m still a girl who will take an impromptu detour that leaves me breathless.

17 comments

  1. Kel says:

    what a beautiful view…I forgot just how much I missed that when I moved away 9 years ago…wow. Thank you for the impromptu detour.
    ~K
    .-= Kel´s last blog ..Blindsided =-.

  2. niri says:

    I almost missed dinner going there to catch a glimpse of that. Loved having you as my roadtrip buddy. I would get lost with you any day 🙂

  3. Jamie says:

    I’m so glad I did this.

    I love the ocean and I just couldn’t stand the thought of being so close and not saying hello to it (even if I was a sweaty mess by the time I got on the airport shuttle). 😉
    .-= Jamie´s last blog ..The Road Less Traveled =-.

  4. Mandala says:

    I love the view. Thanks for sharing this – and for reminding me that sometimes, making impromptu detour could be worthwhile and good for the soul 🙂

  5. Karla T says:

    What a lovely view! I adore the ocean!

    I know what you mean about a nice leisurely patio breakfast. I was able to have a few of those while I was in Costa Rica for business. It was so nice.

  6. Deb - Mom of 3 Girls says:

    I walked over there the day before – isn’t that view breathtaking!! I still haven’t even looked at my pictures yet, but yours is gorgeous!!

    I’m so glad we finally got to meet in person and chat – loved getting to know you better! 🙂
    .-= Deb – Mom of 3 Girls´s last blog ..Wordless Wednesday 158

  7. Security says:

    That’s indeed a very beautiful place and I think that it would been the priority of almost all the people to have visited the place and have sometime of their own. I think that it would be of a very good use to many to have some good benefits relaxing in a better way.

  8. Show love says:

    Modern Costa Rica has few vestiges of its past and little of cultural interest but it more than makes up for it as a fine slice of the natural world and an amazing segment of biodiversity.I would say it’s how we roll with the punches of how others decisions and their free will affect us, and using our free will to find a position of solitude.

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